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Brad Farrell - The Effect of Surfactant on Coalescent Partitioning

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Brad Farrell - The Effect of Surfactant on Coalescent Partitioning

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Brad Farrell
Applications Chemist
Emerald Kalama Chemical, LLC

Phone: 360-673-0296
Website: www.emeraldmaterials.com

Co-authors: Emily McBride, Debera Davidson

Abstract

For waterborne coatings, formulators often use coalescents that are not water soluble. To function properly these types of coalescents must partition to the polymer particles to enable them to function properly in aiding film formation.  When using the high-VOC coalescent 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol-monoisobutyrate (TMPDMIB), partitioning will usually occur in the coating in which it is used. This is because, for as long as this coalescent has been available, formulators have literally adjusted the coating formulation for optimal compatibility with the chemistry of TMPDMIB. Ideally, any change in a coatings formulation would be a simple substitution of one raw material for another. When a very-low-VOC coalescent is substituted for a high-VOC coalescent, proper coalescence is often achieved without any changes. However, partitioning issues sometimes occur. The purpose of the paper is to discuss how varying the chemistry of the nonionic surfactant has an influence on partitioning and how lower overall VOC content can be achieved to meet regulations and customer demand while solving common formulation issues related to partitioning.

Biography

Brad is from Vancouver, WA, and received his Bachelor’s degree in Chemistry from Western Washington University in 2015. He then received a Master’s degree in Chemistry with an emphasis in polymers and coatings at the University of Oregon. He received the Best Paper in Vinyl award and Best Student Paper in Vinyl award at ANTEC 2016. Brad now works as a Chemist at Emerald Kalama Chemical in their applications R&D department.

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