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Tyler Hodges - Bio-based Additives as In-can Preservatives for Coatings

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Tyler Hodges e-RACE web.jpg
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Tyler Hodges e-RACE web.jpg

Tyler Hodges - Bio-based Additives as In-can Preservatives for Coatings

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Tyler Hodges

Microbiologist

Reactive Surfaces

Phone: 512-472-8282

Website: www.reactivesurfaces.com

Co-Authors: Lisa K. Kemp, Brittney M. McInnis, Kyle L. Wilhelm, James W. Rawlins, Steve McDaniel

 

Abstract

Water-based paints, coatings, and additives are at greater risk for microbial contamination and product spoilage. However, with increased regulations governing biocide use and levels of incorporation, there is an increasingly urgent need for less toxic, environmentally friendly alternatives. By utilizing the function of biological molecules, such as enzymes and peptides, we have engineered approaches that can be applied to decrease the use of the less desirable traditional biocides. Here we demonstrate the utility of the XTT assay for screening of bio-based additives, and coatings containing them, against common spoilage and coating associated microbes.  The tetrazolium salt is reduced to a water soluble, orange derivative by metabolically active cells and can be measured spectrophotometrically in a high-throughput manner. A microbial panel of spoilage agents including Pseudomonads as well as other gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria was used for initial screening. Over 30 enzyme and peptide-based biological molecules were selected for either known antimicrobial activity or whose mechanism allow for synergistic effects with other bio-based additives.  Following initial antimicrobial screening in the XTT assay, candidate bio-based additives were evaluated using ASTM D2574–16 .  Impacts of bio-based additive incorporation on physical properties of the latex paint were also evaluated. Numerous bio-based additives and combinations were found to decrease cellular metabolism of panel microorganisms by 50% or greater in the XTT assay. Bio-based additives were identified that could selectively eliminate individual panel strain members as well as combinations that completely eliminated recoverable bacterial growth following ASTM-D2574 spoilage challenge.  This demonstrates the feasibility of bio-based additives for prevention of paint spoilage and potential to decrease current biocide levels.

 

Biography

Tyler Hodges is an Assistant Professor in Biological Sciences at William Carey University with a background in pharmaceutical sciences and microbiology.  I have been working with Reactive Surfaces the last four years as a microbiologist helping develop functional coatings and bio-based preservatives.

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